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Beer Styles


This page contains a listing of beer styles and their characteristics. Beer styles are a way of grouping together different brews with similar flavor characteristics and helps to describe a beer to someone who has never had it. Many styles have regional origins and colorful histories which can be just as interesting as the beers themselves. Not all brews fit comfortably into a style, and some styles are more obscure than others. Style guidelines are meant as a general guide or a starting point, and should not be viewed as iron-clad rules about what makes a beer good. Feel free to experiment and create any type of beer flavor you wish, whether it fits one of these descriptions or not. The Beer Judge Certification Program is an organization that defines, categorizes and updates beer styles as they grow and change with time.

Click on any style to display a detailed summary of that style, including flavor descriptions and vital statistics. Click the 'hide' button to collapse the details page and continue browsing.

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Fruit Beer, Herb/Veggie, Christmas, Other Smoked, Steinbier and Other styles are too variable, set with edge values of all other styles
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Light Lager

Lite American Lager
Lite American Lager

This is the quintessential `lawnmower` beer for drinking on hot days while doing yard work. Any commercial beer that uses the term "lite" in it`s name is probably this style. This is a light colored, light bodied and light flavored lager suitable for chugging. A light grainy or corn-like aroma may be present as can low levels of spicy or floral hop aromas, but neither are required. These beers are clear with a light straw to pale yellow color and a white head. The flavor is crisp and dry with small amounts of grainy or corn-like sweetness. A very light body results from the use of adjuncts such as corn or rice. Hop bitterness and flavor are low, with an even balance between the hops and malt. This style is usually highly carbonated to give it a mild acidic bite and is meant to be drunk super cold. This style is designed to be refreshing and thirst quenching with low calories and no strong flavors.

Brewing Tips:
Use 2-row or 6-row base malt or Pilsner LME and add a significant amount of rice or corn as an adjunct. This will help achieve the very light body and color desired for the style. Use little in the way of specialty malts or hop additions. There should be no strong flavors of any kind. Aim for high carbonation to give the beer a refreshing zip.

Original Gravity: 1.028 - 1.040
Final Gravity: 0.998 - 1.008
IBUs: 8 - 12
SRM: 2 - 3
Alcohol: 2.8% - 4.2%

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Standard American Lager
Standard American Lager

A stronger version of the lite lager, with more alcohol. This is a light colored, light bodied and light flavored lager. A light grainy or corn-like aroma may be present as can low levels of spicy or floral hop aromas, but neither are required. These beers are clear with a light straw to medium yellow color and a white head. The flavor is crisp and dry with small amounts of grainy or corn-like sweetness. A light body results from the use of adjuncts such as corn or rice. Hop bitterness and flavor are kept to low amounts, with an even balance between the hops and malt. This style is usually highly carbonated to give it a mild acidic bite and is designed to be drunk super cold. These beers are meant to be refreshing and thirst quenching with low calories and no strong flavors.

Brewing Tips:
Use 2-row or 6-row base malt or Pilsner LME and add a fair amount of rice or corn as an adjunct. This will help achieve the light body and color desired for the style. Use little in the way of specialty malts or hop additions. There should be no strong flavors of any kind. Aim for high carbonation to give the beer a refreshing zip.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.050
Final Gravity: 1.004 - 1.010
IBUs: 8 - 15
SRM: 2 - 4
Alcohol: 4.2% - 5.3%

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Premium American Lager
Premium American Lager

A stronger version of the standard american lager, with more alcohol. This style has more flavor than the lite or standard American lagers, but still does not have any singularly strong flavors. This is a light colored, light bodied and light flavored lager. A light grainy or corn-like aroma may be present as can low levels of spicy or floral hop aromas, but neither are required. These beers are clear with a light straw to golden color and a white head. The flavor is crisp and dry with small amounts of grainy or corn-like sweetness. Adjuncts such as corn or rice can be used, but usually are done in lower amounts than the lite or standard versions. This style can be all-malt. Hop bitterness and flavor are kept to low amounts, with an even balance between the hops and malt. This style is usually highly carbonated to give it a mild acidic bite and is meant to be drunk super cold. These beers are refreshing and thirst quenching, but more filling than the standard or lite versions.

Brewing Tips:
Use 2-row or 6-row base malt or Pilsner LME. Add a rice or corn as an adjunct if desired, but use less than you would for a Standard or Lite American Lager. Use little in the way of specialty malts or hop additions. Aim to make the malt and hop flavors noticeable, but not strong. Aim for high carbonation to give the beer a refreshing zip.

Original Gravity: 1.046 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.012
IBUs: 15 - 25
SRM: 2 - 6
Alcohol: 4.6% - 6.0%

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International Pale Lager
International Pale Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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European Pale Lager

Czech Pale Lager
Czech Pale Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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German Leichtbier
German Leichtbier



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Pale Kellerbier
Pale Kellerbier



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Munich Helles
Munich Helles

A malt-accentuated beer from Munich, this style was created in 1895 at the Spaten brewery to compete with the popular Pilsner-style beers. Munich Helles is a malt forward, but well attenuated beer that showcases quality pilsner malt without being overly sweet. The color is yellow to pale gold with a creamy white head and good clarity. The aroma is pleasant with a clean Pils malt scent and moderately-low noble hop aroma that comes off spicy. The slightly sweet, malty flavor is dominated by grainy and Pils malt characteristics. A low to medium hop bitterness supports the malty palate with spicy noble hop flavors but lets the malt be the star. Medium bodied, with medium carbonation, the finish is smooth, malty and clean.

Brewing Tips:
Use water with a moderate carbonate content, German Pilsner malt and German noble hop varieties. A low background note of DMS may be present, but there should be no esters or diacetyl. Keep mash temperatures such that no astringency is pulled from the grains.

Original Gravity: 1.045 - 1.051
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.012
IBUs: 16 - 22
SRM: 3 - 5
Alcohol: 4.7% - 5.4%

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German Helles Export / Dortmunder Export
German Helles Export / Dortmunder Export

A light colored lager from the Dortmund industrial region, this style is well balanced and smooth. It has the malt profile of a Helles and the hop character of a Pils. With a slightly higher starting gravity than other light lagers, this beer is stronger in alcohol than similar lager styles. The higher OG also provides a firm body and maltiness that complements the hop bitterness. Golden in color and clear with a persistent white head, the aroma is of noble hop varieties with a moderate pilsner malt quality that can be grainy or sweet. Neither of these aspects dominate the flavor, remaining in balance to create a smooth and crisp beer. Medium bodied with medium levels of carbonation, the aftertaste has a lingering bitterness that retains its balance with the malt. Some mineral character may be apparent from the water.

Brewing Tips:
Dortmunder water has a high mineral content with high levels of sulfates, carbonates and chlorides. Use German Pilsner malt, German or Czech noble hops, and a German lager yeast.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 23 - 30
SRM: 4 - 6
Alcohol: 4.8% - 6.0%

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Festbier
Festbier



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Pilsner

German Pilsner
German Pilsner

Drier and crisper than a bohemian pilsner, the German pilsner began as a copy of that style adapted to brewing conditions in Germany. The higher mineral content of the water there produces lagers with a more defined and longer lasting bitterness. These beers tend to be lighter in color and body than the bohemian counterpart, with higher carbonation to accentuate the crispness. This is a refreshing beer style that prominently features noble German hop varieties. The aroma is clean with a light malty or cracker like tone and distinctive flowery or spicy noble hops. There may be a little bit of sulfur in the aroma as well, coming from either the water or the yeast. The beer is straw to golden colored and very clear with a long-lasting white head. Flavor is crisp and bitter with a moderately dry finish. Only low to moderate amounts of malt character are present, with the wort being well attenuated. Some grain flavors or slight pilsner malt sweetness are acceptable as well. Hop bitterness dominates taste and lingers through the finish and the aftertaste. Hop flavor is only derived from German noble hops. This beer is clean with no fruity esters or diacetyl.

Brewing Tips:
drier, crisper, spritzier and more refreshing than a bohemian

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.050
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.013
IBUs: 25 - 45
SRM: 2 - 5
Alcohol: 4.4% - 5.2%

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Bohemian Pilsner / Premium Czech Lager
Bohemian Pilsner / Premium Czech Lager

The original pilsner brewed with very soft water, this was the first light colored beer. Low sulfate, low carbonate water is a staple of this style, creating a soft and rounded hop profile consisting of spicy, floral Saaz hops. A rich aroma with complex malt may contain some restrained diacetyl, but is otherwise clean, with no fruity esters. Very pale gold to a deep burnished gold, this beer is very clear with a dense, long-lasting and creamy white head. Rich, complex malt flavor is combined with a pronounced yet rounded bitterness and spicy flavor from Saaz hops. Some diacetyl is acceptable, but not necessary. Bitterness is prominent but never harsh, and does not linger, with the aftertaste being a balance between the malt and hops. This is a medium bodied, medium carbonation beer. Dextrins may provide additional body, and slight diacetyl can enhance the perception of a fuller palate. Overall , this is a crisp, complex and well-rounded yet refreshing brew.

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.013 - 1.017
IBUs: 35 - 45
SRM: 3.5 - 6
Alcohol: 4.2% - 5.4%

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Classic American Pilsner
Classic American Pilsner

A substantial American Pilsner that can stand up to the classic European varieties, this style was created using the American grains and hops that were available to German brewers who initially brought the Pilsner style to the United States. The classic American Pilsner was brewed both pre-Prohibition and post-Prohibition with a slight drop in both OG and IBUs after prohibition. Refreshing, but with malt and hop character that stands out when compared to modern light lagers. Maize lends a distinctive grainy sweetness and rice contributes a crisper, more neutral character. Low to medium grainy, corn-like or sweet malty aromas may be evident, although rice-based versions are more neutral. Medium to moderately high hop aroma, often coming from classic noble hops, will also be present. This style has a clean lager character, with no fruitiness or diacetyl, although some DMS is acceptable. Yellow to deep gold color, with bright clarity and a substantial, long lasting white head. The flavor exhibits a moderate maltiness, similar in character to the Continental Pilsners but somewhat lighter in intensity due to the use of flaked maize (corn) or rice as an adjunct. Corn-like sweetness is offset by a substantial hop bitterness. Rice-based versions are crisper, drier, and often lack corn-like flavors. Medium to high hop flavor and bitterness usually come from native american hops or noble varities, never from high alpha modern hops. Should be smooth, clean and well-lagered with a medium body and rich, creamy mouthfeel and medium to high carbonation levels.

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 25 - 40
SRM: 3 - 6
Alcohol: 4.5% - 6.0%

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Pre-Prohibition Lager
Pre-Prohibition Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Amber Lager

Vienna Lager
Vienna Lager

This is the original amber lager style. Similar to Oktoberfest, this beer is less intense and lighter in overall malt character, yet still decidedly balanced toward the malt. Vienna lager is characterized by a soft, elegant maltiness that dries out in the finish to avoid becoming sweet. The style owes much of its character to the use of Vienna malt, which provides a lightly toasty and complex, malt profile rich in melanoidins. Light reddish-amber to copper in color with bright clarity and a large, off-white head, this beer is medium-light to medium in body with a gentle creaminess. A moderately rich malt aroma of Vienna or Munich malt characterizes this beer and a light toasted malt aroma may also be present. This style has a clean lager character, with no fruity esters or diacetyl. Caramel flavor or aroma is absent. The forefront of this style should be a soft, elegant malt complexity, with a firm enough hop bitterness to provide a balanced finish. The finish is fairly dry, with both malt and hop bitterness present in the aftertaste.
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Brewing Tips:
Continental hops (preferably noble varieties) should be used. Some caramel malts or darker malts can be used to add color and sweetness, but they shouldn’t add any significant aroma and flavor or any roasted character.

Original Gravity: 1.046 - 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.014
IBUs: 18 - 30
SRM: 10 - 16
Alcohol: 4.5% - 5.5%

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Märzen / Oktoberfest
Märzen / Oktoberfest

Based on an adaptation of the Vienna Lager style, this is a smooth, clean, and rather rich brew with a depth of malt character. This is one of the classic malty styles, with a maltiness that is often described as soft, complex, and elegant but never cloying. The German word Märzen means March. Traditional examples are brewed in the spring, stored in cold caves or cellars (the word lager means to store) during the warm summer months and served in autumn for traditional celebrations. Märzen-style ales are often made with a similar malt and hop profile, but a more complex yeast character from the ale strains used. Oktoberfest beers can range in color from golden to orange-amber in color and always exhibit a pronounced, long lasting head. They are medium bodied with a creamy texture and medium carbonation. Rich German malt aromas from Vienna and/or Munich malt are the primary scent and a light to moderate toasted malt aroma is often present as well. This style has a clean lager character, with no fruity esters or diacetyl. Initially sweet from the complex malts, this beer finishes moderately dry. Distinctive and complex maltiness often includes a toasted aspect, but isn`t terribly sweet. Hop bitterness is moderate, with little hop flavor coming from noble varieties. Balance is always toward the malt, though the finish is not sweet. Noticeable caramel or roasted flavors are absent.
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Original Gravity: 1.050 - 1.057
Final Gravity: 1.012 - 1.016
IBUs: 20 - 28
SRM: 7 - 14
Alcohol: 4.8% - 5.7%

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Czech Amber Lager
Czech Amber Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Amber Kellerbier
Amber Kellerbier



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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International Amber Lager
International Amber Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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California Common
California Common

Originating from the American west coast, this style uses a lager yeast strain that ferments warmer than most lagers, but at the bottom of the ale temperature range. It is a lightly fruity beer with a firm, grainy maltiness that imparts interesting toasty and caramel flavors. The California Common style is similar to an American pale or amber ale, yet differs in that the hop contributions have woody and earthy tones rather than citrus. Malt flavors are toasty and caramel-like, the hopping is always assertive, and a warm-fermented lager yeast is used. Medium amber to light copper color and generally clear, this style has a moderate off-white head with good retention. The flavor is moderately malty with a pronounced hop bitterness. The malt character is usually toasty (not roasted) with caramel tones. The finish is fairly dry and crisp, with a lingering hop bitterness and a firm, grainy malt flavor. Light fruity esters are acceptable, but otherwise clean.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.011 - 1.014
IBUs: 30 - 45
SRM: 10 - 14
Alcohol: 4.5% - 5.5%

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Dark Lager

Dark American Lager
Dark American Lager

A slightly darker version of the American Lager, this style maintains the generally light flavor while being a somewhat sweeter version with a little more body and flavor. This style covers a wide range of international lagers that are darker than pale, but not assertively bitter or roasted. It has little to no malt aroma, medium-low to no roasted or caramel malt aroma and light to no spicy or floral hop presence. There is a deep amber to dark brown color with bright clarity, ruby highlights and a light tan foam. The body is light to medium and smooth, although this is a highly-carbonated style. These beers are moderately crisp with low to moderate levels of sweetness, caramel or roasted malt flavors and may include mild hints of coffee, molasses or cocoa. Burnt or moderately strong roasted malt flavors are considered a defect, and there is little hop flavor and only a mild hop bitterness.

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.012
IBUs: 8 - 20
SRM: 14 - 22
Alcohol: 4.2% - 6.0%

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Munich Dunkel
Munich Dunkel

A classic brown lager from Germany which was developed as a darker, malt-accented beer. Originating in Munich, the style has become very popular throughout Bavaria and is characterized by depth and complexity of Munich malt and the melanoidins that come from it. Deep copper to dark brown in color, this style often also has a red tint. A creamy, light to medium tan head sits on top of a beer that is usually clear, although murky versions do exist. This beer is rich in bready Munich malt flavors, but is not as intense as a bock or as roasted as a schwarzbier. Traditional versions can have a liquid bread or toast kind of taste, with a yeasty and earthy richness. Hints of chocolate, nuts, caramel, and/or toffee are also acceptable. A medium to medium-full body provides a firm mouthfeel without being heavy. Moderate carbonation, this beer may have a light astringency and a slight alcohol warming.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.016
IBUs: 18 - 28
SRM: 14 - 28
Alcohol: 4.5% - 6.5%

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Schwarzbier
Schwarzbier

A dark German lager that balances roasted yet smooth malt flavors with moderate hop bitterness. Schwarzbiers are darker than dunkels, nearly black, with a drier palate and a mild roasted malt edge that balances out the malt sweetness. They are dark brown in color, often with deep ruby red highlights and a persistent, tan-colored head. Light to moderate malt aromas and flavors are present, which can have a clean and neutral character or a rich, sweet, Munich-like intensity with a hint of caramel. Light to moderate roasted malt flavors can give a bitter-chocolate finish, but should never taste burnt. Medium-low to medium bitterness, which can last into the finish, accompanies a light to moderate noble hop flavor. Clean lager character is a must, with no by-products. Some residual sweetness is acceptable but not required. The medium-light to medium body is smooth, with no harshness or astringency despite the use of dark roasted malts.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.046 - 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.016
IBUs: 22 - 32
SRM: 17 - 30
Alcohol: 4.4% - 5.4%

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Czech Dark Lager
Czech Dark Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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International Dark Lager
International Dark Lager



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Bock

Maibock / Helles Bock
Maibock / Helles Bock

A strong lager beer that is fairly pale, yet malty. Often thought of as a pale version of a traditional bock, this style is designed to walk the line between blandness and too much color. The serving of Maibock is associated with springtime and the month of May. This beer typically has less dark and rich malt flavors than a traditional bock, while still retaining a notable malt character. Hop character is generally more apparent than in other bocks, and it can be drier and more bitter. This beer is deep gold to light amber in color, with good clarity and a creamy white head. The rich flavor of continental European pale malts dominates, with a lightly toasted quality and little to no caramelization. Hop flavor is low to moderate and may have a low spicy or peppery quality. Maibock is medium-bodied, with moderately high carbonation. It is smooth and clean with no harshness or astringency, despite the higher hop bitterness than other bocks. Some alcohol warming may be present.

Original Gravity: 1.064 - 1.072
Final Gravity: 1.011 - 1.018
IBUs: 23 - 35
SRM: 6 - 11
Alcohol: 6.3% - 7.4%

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Traditional Bock / Dunkles Bock
Traditional Bock / Dunkles Bock

Bock is a dark, strong and malty lager beer originating in the Northern German city of Einbeck. The name `bock` came into use when the style was brought to Munich, and is based on a mispronunciation of the city`s name. Bocks are light copper to brown in color, often with garnet highlights, and have good clarity despite the dark color. A large, persistent, off-white head sits on top. Medium to medium-full bodied, with moderate to moderately low carbonation. Some alcohol warmth may be found, but a good bock nevers taste hot. This beer is smooth, without any harshness or astringency. A rich and complex maltiness is provided by Munich and Vienna malts, which contribute melanoidins and toasty flavors. Decoction mashing and long boils play an important role in flavor development, as they enhance the caramel and melanoidin flavor aspects of the malt. Hop bitterness is generally only high enough to support the malt flavors, allowing a bit of sweetness to linger into the finish. Bocks are well-attenuated so they will not be cloyingly sweet. This style is clean, with no esters, diacetyl, hop flavor or roasted/burnt character. The word `bock` also means `billy-goat` in German, and is often used in logos and advertisements.

Original Gravity: 1.064 - 1.072
Final Gravity: 1.013 - 1.019
IBUs: 20 - 27
SRM: 14 - 22
Alcohol: 6.3% - 7.2%

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Doppelbock
Doppelbock

A bigger version of a traditional or helles bock, doppelbock is a very strong and rich lager. Most versions are dark colored and display the caramelizing and melanoidin effect of decoction mashing, but excellent pale versions also exist. This style can be considered to have no upper limit for gravity, alcohol and bitterness, although most traditional varieties fit within the given ranges. Doppelbocks are deep gold to dark brown in color with ruby highlights in the darker examples. Lagering provides good clarity, and a large, creamy head sits on top. Very strong versions may suffer from lack of head retention, but most examples have a head that persists. This style is very rich and malty, usually with significant melanoidins and some toasty flavors. A very slight chocolate flavor is optional in darker versions, but is never roasted or burnt. Alcohol flavor is common, but smooth and warming rather than burning. Hop bitterness varies from moderate to moderately low but always allows malt to dominate the flavor. Most versions are fairly sweet, but with an impression of complete attenuation. The sweetness comes from low hopping, not from incomplete fermentation. Paler versions generally have a drier finish and can have more hop character than dark varieties. Many doppelbocks have names ending in “-ator,” often as a tribute to the prototypical Salvator.

Original Gravity: 1.072 - 1.112
Final Gravity: 1.016 - 1.024
IBUs: 16 - 26
SRM: 6 - 25
Alcohol: 7.0% - 10.0%

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Eisbock
Eisbock

An extremely strong, full and malty dark lager created by freezing and concentrating doppelbocks. Ice crystals are removed from the partially frozen beer, leaving behind a stronger flavored and more alcoholic product. Extended lagering is often needed after the freezing to smooth the alcohol and enhance the malt and alcohol balance. Dominated by a balance of rich, intense malt and a definite alcohol presence, eisbocks have no hop impact except to prevent excessive, cloying sweetness. The malt can have melanoidins, toasty qualities, some caramel and occasionally a slight chocolate flavor. The finish should taste of malt and alcohol, and can have a sort of dryness from the alcohol. An eisbock is not syrupy or cloyingly sweet and retains its clean lager character, though it may have significant fruity esters reminiscent of plum, prune or grape. They are deep copper to dark brown in color, often with ruby highlights, and clear from the lagering. Retention of the off-white head may be impaired by higher-than-average alcohol content and low carbonation. Full to very full bodied with low carbonation, eisbocks have a significant alcohol warmth without sharp hotness. Alcohol flavors should not be harsh or solventy. Very smooth without harsh edges from alcohol, bitterness, fusels, or other concentrated flavors. Fractional freezing is considered a form of distillation in many locales, and may require a permit to perform legally.

Original Gravity: 1.078 - 1.120
Final Gravity: 1.020 - 1.035
IBUs: 25 - 35
SRM: 18 - 30
Alcohol: 9.0% - 14.0%

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German Ale

Kölsch
Kölsch

A clean, crisp, delicately balanced ale from Germany. Kölsch beers often have very subtle fruit flavors and aromas and a subdued maltiness leads to a pleasantly refreshing finish. Mistakable for a subtle Pilsner, this beer is fermented using ale yeast instead of lager strains. Very pale to light gold in color, authentic versions are filtered to a brilliant clarity and have a delicate white head. The rounded palate is comprised of a delicate flavor balance between soft and well attenuated malt, an almost imperceptible fruity sweetness from fermentation and a low to medium bitterness with a delicate dryness in the finish. Noble hops are preferred, and their flavor can range from low to moderately high. Kölsch beers are smooth and crisp, with a medium-light body and good attenuation. Some versions can have a slightly mineral or sulfur character that accentuates the dryness and flavor balance, but otherwise this style is very clean. This style is often cold aged after fermentation to give it a clean, lager-like profile.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.050
Final Gravity: 1.007 - 1.011
IBUs: 20 - 30
SRM: 3.5 - 5
Alcohol: 4.4% - 5.2%

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Northern German Altbier
Northern German Altbier

This is a very clean and relatively bitter beer from Germany, the bitterness is balanced by some malt character. Northern German alts are generally darker, more caramel-like, and usually sweeter and less bitter than Düsseldorf Altbier. Most Altbiers produced outside of Düsseldorf are this style. The word `alt` translates to `old` and refers to the old style of brewing (making ales), although the style can be brewed as either an ale or a lager. Those that are made as ales are fermented at cool ale temperatures and lagered at cold temperatures to create a clean profile. Light copper to light brown color, these beers are very clear from extended cold conditioning and have an off-white head with good retention. The flavor is fairly bitter yet balanced by a smooth and sometimes sweet malt character. The malt profile may have a rich, biscuit or light caramel flavor. The finish is dry, often with lingering bitterness. This style has a clean, lager character sometimes with slight sulfur notes, but little to no esters and only a low to medium hop flavor. They are medium bodied and smooth with moderately high carbonation.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.046 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 25 - 40
SRM: 13 - 19
Alcohol: 4.5% - 5.2%

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Düsseldorf Altbier
Düsseldorf Altbier

Düsseldorf Alt is a bitter beer balanced by a pronounced malt richness that is fermented at cool ale temperature (60-65), and lagered at cold temperatures to produce a cleaner, smoother palate than is typical for most ales. They are well balanced, bitter yet malty, clean, smooth and well-attenuated. The traditional style of beer from Düsseldorf, “Alt” refers to the “old” style of brewing (making top-fermented ales) that was common before lager brewing became popular. This style predates the isolation of bottom-fermenting yeast strains, though it approximates many characteristics of lager beers. Düsseldorf Alt can be light amber, orange-bronze or deep copper color, but it stops short of being brown. Brilliant clarity is common (may be filtered) and a thick, creamy, long-lasting off-white head is present. This style has an assertive hop bitterness that is well balanced by a sturdy, yet clean and crisp malt character. The malt presence is moderated by moderately-high to high attenuation, so it isn`t super sweet, but considerable rich and complex malt flavors are still present. A long-lasting bittersweet or nutty finish reflects both the hop bitterness and malt complexity and can be somewhat dry. No roasted malt flavors or harshness are present. Some yeast strains may impart a slight sulfur character and light ester flavors may remain. This style is smooth with medium-high carbonation and little to no astringency. Despite being full of flavor, this beer is light bodied enough to be consumed as a session beer in its home brewpubs in Düsseldorf.

Original Gravity: 1.046 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 35 - 50
SRM: 11 - 17
Alcohol: 4.5% - 5.2%

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German Wheat and Rye Beer

Weizen / Weissbier
Weizen / Weissbier

A traditional wheat-based ale from southern Germany, this is a refreshing beer style with unique spicy and fruity notes that come directly from the yeast. It is most popular during the warm summer months, but available year round. These are thirst-quenching beers that mature quickly and are best enjoyed fresh. The term "weizen" translates to English as "wheat" and the term "weiss" means "white". Ranging from pale straw to very dark gold in color, these beers have a thick, long-lasting white head and are often hazy due to the high protein content of wheat. The first thing people note when drinking this style is the prominant flavor of banana and clove. The yeast strains used produce phenol and ester components that create the spicy clove and fruity banana overtones. The balance and strength of these flavors will vary from beer to beer, but the best examples are well balanced yet prominent. These beers are not usually made from 100% wheat, and can have up to 50% pilsner malt. The sweet maltiness of pilsner and the soft, bready flavor of wheat complements the yeast. The term "hefe" in hefeweizen refers to the presence of yeast sediment still in the bottle, which is intentionally roused and poured into the glass. Hefeweizens are cloudy from the yeast and have more yeast flavors. Filtered weissbiers are called "krystalweizen" and have brilliant clarity, with less spiciness and fruity notes. Hop bitterness and flavor are low, and a tart or citrusy character may be present. Well rounded, flavorful palate with a relatively dry finish. Medium-light to medium in body, weissbiers are never heavy and are meant as a highly drinkable warm weather beer with a light finish and effervescence.
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Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.014
IBUs: 8 - 15
SRM: 2 - 8
Alcohol: 4.3% - 5.6%

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Dunkelweizen / Dunkels Weissbier
Dunkelweizen / Dunkels Weissbier

A moderately dark, yet refreshing wheat-based ale that combines the yeast and wheat character of a hefeweizen with the malty richness of a Munich Dunkel. The word "dunkel" means "dark", so the name of this style literally translates to "dark wheat". The presence of Munich or Vienna barley malts gives this style a rich malt character not found in a hefeweizen, while maintaining the fruity and spicy tones from traditional hefeweizen yeast. These beers are light copper to mahogany brown in color with a thick, long-lasting head that is off-white in color. The high protein content of wheat produces varying amounts of haze and yeast sediment poured from the bottle adds cloudiness. The prominant flavors of banana and clove found in hefeweizens are still present, but are balanced out somewhat by the rich caramel and melanoidin malt flavors of the specialty grains. The specialty malt flavors combine with the grainy and bready character of the wheat to support the yeast flavors, and do not overpower them. Hop bitterness and flavor are low. A tart or citrusy character may be present, but less so than in hefeweizens. The well rounded, flavorful palate is somewhat sweet with a relatively dry finish. Medium bodied, dunkelweizens are rich and full with a light finish and effervescence.
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Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.014
IBUs: 10 - 18
SRM: 14 - 23
Alcohol: 4.3% - 5.6%

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Weizenbock
Weizenbock

A dunkelweizen beer brewed to bock or doppelbock strength, this is a strong wheat-based ale combining the malty and fruity flavors of a dunkelweizen and the rich strength and body of a bock. Dark amber to dark, ruby brown in color, this style has a thick, long-lasting tan head. The high protein content of wheat impairs clarity in this traditionally unfiltered style, although the level of haze is somewhat variable. The suspended yeast sediment (which should be roused before drinking) also contributes to the cloudiness. The high protein content of wheat produces varying amounts of haze and yeast sediment poured from the bottle adds cloudiness. The flavor profile is complex with rich melanoidins, dark fruit, spicy clove phenols, light banana esters, mild vanilla and a moderate wheat flavor. Copious amounts of Munich or Vienna malts bolster the malty richness even further. There may be a light chocolate character or a faintly tart quality. Hop bitterness and flavor are low. The wheat, malt and yeast character dominate the flavor, with high alcohol balancing the finish. The medium to full body is imbued with a creamy mouthfeel, and the warming sensation of substantial alcohol content is often found. Higher amounts of Munich and Vienna malts provide additional richness and fullness.

Original Gravity: 1.064 - 1.090
Final Gravity: 1.015 - 1.022
IBUs: 15 - 30
SRM: 12 - 25
Alcohol: 6.5% - 8.0%

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Roggenbier
Roggenbier

A dunkelweizen made with rye rather than wheat, Roggenbier has a greater body, a spicy character and often includes a light amount of finishing hops. Rye has been characterized by many as having the most assertive flavor of all cereal grains. The color of this style ranges from light to dark copper and can even have a very dark red hue. The off-white head is creamy, dense and persistent and the beer is usually cloudy or hazy. The flavor is grainy, with a hearty rye flavor that is somewhat spicy. The initial malt sweetness, sometimes with a little caramel, is tasted first, then the yeast and rye flavors take over. Weizen yeast traits of banana, clove and sometimes citrus are present, but the intensity of these flavors is not always as strong as in other German wheat beers. Roggenbiers have a grainy finish with a tangy, lightly bitter aftertaste from the rye. Low to moderate noble hop flavor may persist into aftertaste and support the spicy character of the rye. Medium to medium-full bodied, this beer has high carbonation and may present a light tartness.

Brewing Tips:
Rye is a huskless grain that is difficult to mash. A high beta-glucan content often creates a gummy mash texture that is prone to sticking.

Original Gravity: 1.046 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.014
IBUs: 10 - 20
SRM: 14 - 19
Alcohol: 4.5% - 6.0%

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Gose
Gose

A top-fermented sour beer from Germany, Gose is an unfiltered wheat based style with a pronounced salty flavor. The saltiness comes either from a naturally salty water source or the intentional addition of salt. At least 50% of the grain bill is malted wheat, making this pale beer quite cloudy. A lemon-like tartness and various herbal characteristics are also prominent, and coriander is a common addition. Hop character is restrained, allowing the tartness and wheat qualities to shine. The characteristic sourness comes from lactobacillus bacteria added after the boil. This is a crisp and refreshing brew with a dry finish.

Brewing Tips:
brewed with at least 50% of the grain bill being malted wheat

Original Gravity: 1.036 - 1.056
Final Gravity: 1.006 - 1.010
IBUs: 5 - 12
SRM: 3 - 4
Alcohol: 4.2% - 4.8%

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American Ale

Cream Ale
Cream Ale

A clean, well-attenuated American lawnmower beer that is light and crisp. Meant to be thirst quenching, this is an ale version of the American lager style produced by ale brewers to compete with lager brewers in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States. The use of flaked maize or refined sugars as adjuncts is common with this style. Cream ales are pale straw in color with a brilliant, sparkling clarity. Faint malt aroma with a sweet, corn-like scent and low levels of DMS are commonly found. Low to moderate maltiness and sweetness is balanced with a low hop bitterness. This style is well attenuated and balanced, so that neither malt nor hops prevail in the taste. A low to moderate corny flavor from corn adjuncts is common. Finish can vary from somewhat dry to faintly sweet from the corn, malt, and sugar. Any variety of hops may be used, but neither hops nor malt should dominate the profile. Cold conditioning isn`t traditional, but modern brewers sometimes use it.
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Original Gravity: 1.042 - 1.055
Final Gravity: 1.006 - 1.012
IBUs: 15 - 20
SRM: 2.5 - 5
Alcohol: 4.2% - 5.6%

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Blonde Ale
Blonde Ale

An easy-drinking, malt-oriented American craft beer that is light colored and approachable. A style produced by many American microbreweries and brewpubs, this beer is often seen as an entry-level craft beer for drinkers looking to expand their horizons past pale lagers. Light yellow to deep gold in color, they have a white head with fairly good retention. Blonde ales start with an Initial soft malty sweetness with some light flavors of bread, toast, biscuit or wheat. Caramel flavors are typically absent. They often have more hop character than a cream ale, but are not hopped heavily. A medium body with medium-high carbonation helps carry the smooth flavors. Cream ales are usually all barley malt, but small amounts of wheat, honey, spices or sugar adjuncts may be found as long as they do not overshadow the base malt flavors. They do not use flaked maize or rice, and are generally fermented with a clean american yeast.
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Original Gravity: 1.038 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.013
IBUs: 15 - 28
SRM: 3 - 6
Alcohol: 3.8% - 5.5%

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American Wheat
American Wheat

A refreshing wheat beer that often displays more hops and less yeast character than its German cousin. Different variations exist, from an easy-drinking fairly sweet beer to a dry, aggressively hopped beer with a strong wheat flavor. They are usually pale yellow or gold in color with a big, resilient head and can be either clear or hazy. Significant quantities of wheat create a mild to moderately strong grainy wheat flavor that can linger into the finish. These beers have low to moderate hop bitterness, which sometimes lasts into the aftertaste, and low to moderate hop flavor from either citrusy American or spicy/floral noble varieties. Esters can be apparent, but a strong German Weizen character (banana or clove) will not be present. A light spiciness from the wheat is acceptable. Medium bodied with medium to high carbonation, this style may have a slightly crisp or sharp finish. American wheat beers are often brewed with clean american yeast strains such as wlp320 American Hefeweizen.
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Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.055
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.013
IBUs: 15 - 30
SRM: 3 - 6
Alcohol: 4.0% - 5.5%

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American Rye
American Rye

A refreshing rye beer that often displays more hops and less yeast character than the German Roggenbier. Different variations exist, from an easy-drinking fairly sweet beer to a dry, aggressively hopped beer with a strong rye flavor. They are usually pale yellow or gold in color with a big, resilient head and can be either clear or hazy. Significant quantities of rye create a mild to moderately strong grainy rye flavor that is richer and spicier than wheat. These beers have low to moderate hop bitterness, which sometimes lasts into the finish, and low to moderate hop flavor from either citrusy American or spicy/floral noble varieties. Esters can be apparent, but a strong German Weizen character (banana or clove) is absent. Spiciness from the rye is common, but is usually fairly light. Medium bodied with medium to high carbonation, this style may have a slightly crisp or sharp finish. The high glucan content of rye gives this style a mouth-coating texture and can also make sparging difficult. American rye beers are often brewed with clean american yeast strains such as wlp320 American Hefeweizen.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.055
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.013
IBUs: 15 - 30
SRM: 3 - 6
Alcohol: 4.0% - 5.5%

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American Amber Ale
American Amber Ale

Like an American pale ale with more body and caramel richness this style is balanced more towards malt than hops, yet hopping rates can still be significant. The color range can overlap with American pale ales, but Ambers tend to be darker. They are amber to coppery brown in color, with a moderately large off-white head and good retention. Usually mostly clear, dry-hopped versions of this style may be a little hazy. Moderate to high hop flavor from American hop varieties, often with a citrusy quality is balanced with moderately strong malt flavors. An initial malty sweetness is followed by moderate caramel flavor, and sometimes other character malts in lesser amounts. Malt and hop bitterness are fairly evenly balanced and support each other, rather than vying for dominance. Caramel sweetness and hop qualities can linger somewhat into the medium to full finish. Medium to medium-full bodied, with moderate to high carbonation, the overall finish is smooth and lacks the astringency often associated with high hopping rates.

Original Gravity: 1.045 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 25 - 40
SRM: 10 - 17
Alcohol: 4.5% - 6.2%

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Kentucky Common
Kentucky Common



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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American Brown Ale
American Brown Ale

Often considered a bigger, maltier, hoppier interpretation of Northern English brown ale this beer is a bolder version of that traditional style. The increased hop profile often includes the citrus-accented hop presence that is characteristic of American hop varieties, but earthy or floral varieties are also used. Originated by American home brewers, the American Brown Ale is related to American Pale and American Amber Ales, but has more of a caramel and chocolate character to balance the hop bitterness and finish. This style is light to very dark brown in color and clear, with an off-white to light tan head. Malty flavors of caramel, toast or chocolate are stronger than in other browns, but not to the degree of a Porter, and accented with a medium-high bitterness. Hop flavor can be light to moderate and may have a citrusy character, but not necessarily. This style is not a brown colored version of an IPA, but a hop forward brown ale with enough malt to create balance. Medium to medium-full bodied, the more bitter versions may have a dry, resiny impression. The medium to medium-dry finish provides an aftertaste of both malt and hops.
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Original Gravity: 1.045 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.016
IBUs: 20 - 42
SRM: 18 - 35
Alcohol: 4.3% - 6.2%

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American Pale Ale
American Pale Ale

This is an American adaptation of the English pale ale, reflecting indigenous American ingredients. The American Pale Ale is generally lighter in color, with a cleaner fermentation and less caramel flavors than English counterparts. This is a refreshing style, that is hoppy yet has sufficient supporting malt so the hops don`t overwhelm. Pale golden to deep amber in color, Pale Ales have a moderately large white with good retention. Dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy, but otherwise this style is mostly clear. A moderate to high hop flavor usually showcases the citrusy American hop character, although other hop varieties may be used to create more of a pine or floral tone. Dry hopping may add grassy notes, but this character will not be excessive. Clean malt character supports the hop presentation and may show small amounts of specialty malt character, but the balance is typically towards the hops. Caramel flavors are usually restrained or absent. Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the medium-dry finish. A medium-light to medium body and moderately high carbonation supports a smooth finish without the astringency often associated with high hopping rates.
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Original Gravity: 1.045 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 30 - 45
SRM: 5 - 14
Alcohol: 4.5% - 6.2%

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English Brown Ale

Mild Ale
Mild Ale

A light-flavored, malt-accented beer that is readily suited to drinking in quantity, Mild Ale is refreshing yet flavorful. Most are low-gravity session beers in the range 3.1-3.8% alcohol, although some versions may be made stronger export or special occasions. Generally served on cask, bottled versions don’t often travel well. A wide range of interpretations are possible, with some versions seeming like lower gravity brown porters. Usually copper to dark brown or mahogany in color, this style is generally clear, although traditionally unfiltered. Mild Ale is a malty beer that may have a wide range of malt and yeast based flavors. Can finish either sweet or dry, and darker versions may have a dry, roasted finish and light astringency. There is enough bitterness to provide some balance but not enough to overpower the malt. With a light to medium body and generally low carbonation, sweeter versions may seem to have a rather full mouthfeel.

Original Gravity: 1.030 - 1.038
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.013
IBUs: 10 - 25
SRM: 12 - 25
Alcohol: 2.8% - 4.5%

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Southern English Brown
Southern English Brown

A rare variety of English Ale that is luscious and malt-oriented with a complexity of malt flavor reminiscent of caramel and dark fruit. Southern English (or “London-style”) brown ales are darker, sweeter, and lower gravity than their Northern cousins and may seem somewhat like a smaller version of a sweet stout. Light brown to a dark, near black, brown color, Southern Browns are nearly opaque but still relatively clear. The flavor has a deep, caramel or toffee like malt sweetness that lasts into the finish. Hints of biscuit and coffee are common and there may be a moderate dark fruit complexity. Hop bitterness and flavor is low to non-existent and there is little to no perceivable roasty or bitter black malt flavor. This beer has a medium body, but the residual sweetness may give a heavier impression. There is a moderately low amount of carbonation and a creamy, smooth texture. Southern English Browns have a moderately sweet finish with a smooth, malty aftertaste.

Original Gravity: 1.033 - 1.042
Final Gravity: 1.011 - 1.014
IBUs: 12 - 20
SRM: 19 - 35
Alcohol: 2.8% - 4.1%

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Northern English Brown
Northern English Brown

The quintessential style that most people think of when they hear "English Brown", Northern English Brown Ales are drier and more hop-oriented than the southern versions. The sweet, caramel-like flavors are largely replaced with a nutty character, giving this style the nickname "Nut Brown Ale". Dark amber to reddish-brown in color, this style is clear with an off-white or light tan head. A gentle malt sweetness, with a nutty and lightly caramelized character comprise the flavor and may also have toasted, biscuit, or toffee-like components. Medium in bitterness, the balance is nearly even, with hop flavor being on the low end and only a light hop aroma coming from the glass. Medium-light to medium bodied, Northern English Browns have a medium to medium-high level of carbonation and a medium-dry to dry finish.
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Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.013
IBUs: 20 - 30
SRM: 12 - 22
Alcohol: 4.2% - 5.4%

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London Brown Ale
London Brown Ale



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Scottish and Irish Ale

Irish Red Ale
Irish Red Ale

An easy-drinking, malt-focused beer originating in Ireland, this style starts with an initial malty sweetness and ends with a pronounced roasted dryness. These beers are usually fermented with the Irish Ale yeast strain that is popular for making stouts, but they are sometimes brewed with lager yeast to create a cleaner profile. The color ranges from amber to a deep reddish copper color, with most examples exhibiting a deep reddish hue. Malt flavor shows a moderate caramel component and sweetness, occasionally with a buttered toast or toffee-like quality. Irish reds finish with a light taste of roasted grain and a characteristic dryness to the finish. There generally aren`t any strong hop flavors, a light flavor of English style hops may be present. The use of roasted grains may increase the perception of bitterness, but there is only low amounts of hop bittering. When served too cold, the roasted character and bitterness may seem more elevated. Irish red ales have a light to medium body, and are more attenuated than Scottish ales. They have a dry, clean and smooth finish.
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Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.014
IBUs: 17 - 28
SRM: 9 - 18
Alcohol: 4.0% - 6.0%

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Scottish Light 60/-
Scottish Light 60/-

These are traditional Scottish session beers reflecting the indigenous water and malt profiles. Scottish ales have less hops than their English counterparts due to the expense of importing them. Traditionally, Scottish beers were taxed based on alcohol content, so the term 60 shilling (written 60/-) refers to the amount of tax and therefore the ABV range of the style. They are deep amber to dark copper in color and usually very clear due to the traditionally long, cool fermentation. They are cleanly malty with a drying finish and occasionally some slight esters or a faint bit of peaty earthiness. Malt is the primary flavor, but isn`t overly strong. Hop bitterness is low, and the balance is always to the malt, although not always by a drastic amount. Little hop flavor is present in any Scottish ale. The initial malty sweetness is usually accentuated by a moderate amount of kettle caramelization, but typically no caramel malts are used. A low amount of peaty character may be present, and may be perceived as earthy or smoky. The smoky character comes from the water or yeast, not from the malt. Very small amounts of peat smoked malt may be used to replicate the smoke character, but the use of large amounts is inappropriate for this style and turn it into a smoke beer, rather than a Scottish ale. They have a medium body which can be a bit creamy. Most of these beers finish fairly dry despite their relatively sweet palate, often due to small additions of roasted barley.

Original Gravity: 1.030 - 1.035
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.013
IBUs: 10 - 20
SRM: 9 - 17
Alcohol: 2.5% - 3.2%

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Scottish Heavy 70/-
Scottish Heavy 70/-

Slightly stronger than the Scottish Light Ale, this is a traditional Scottish beer reflecting the indigenous water and malt profiles. Scottish ales have less hops than their English counterparts due to the expense of importing them. Traditionally, Scottish beers were taxed based on alcohol content, so the term 70 shilling (written 70/-) refers to the amount of tax and therefore the ABV range of the style. They are deep amber to dark copper in color and usually very clear due to the traditionally long, cool fermentation. They are cleanly malty with a drying finish and occasionally some slight esters or a faint bit of peaty earthiness. Malt is the primary flavor, but isn`t overly strong. Hop bitterness is low, and the balance is always to the malt, although not always by a drastic amount. Little hop flavor is present in any Scottish ale. The initial malty sweetness is usually accentuated by a moderate amount of kettle caramelization, but typically no caramel malts are used. A low amount of peaty character may be present, and may be perceived as earthy or smoky. The smoky character comes from the water or yeast, not from the malt. Very small amounts of peat smoked malt may be used to replicate the smoke character, but the use of large amounts is inappropriate for this style and turn it into a smoke beer, rather than a Scottish ale. They have a medium body which can be a bit creamy. Most of these beers finish fairly dry despite their relatively sweet palate, often due to small additions of roasted barley.

Original Gravity: 1.035 - 1.040
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 10 - 25
SRM: 9 - 17
Alcohol: 3.2% - 3.9%

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Scottish Export 80/-
Scottish Export 80/-

Stronger than the Scottish Light or Heavy Ales, these are traditional Scottish beers reflecting the indigenous water and malt profiles. Scottish ales have less hops than their English counterparts due to the expense of importing them. Traditionally, Scottish beers were taxed based on alcohol content, so the term 80 shilling (written 80/-) refers to the amount of tax and therefore the ABV range of the style. They are deep amber to dark copper in color and usually very clear due to the traditionally long, cool fermentation. They are cleanly malty with a drying finish and occasionally some slight esters or a faint bit of peaty earthiness. Malt is the primary flavor, but isn`t overly strong. Hop bitterness is low, and the balance is always to the malt, although not always by a drastic amount. Little hop flavor is present in any Scottish ale. The initial malty sweetness is usually accentuated by a moderate amount of kettle caramelization, but typically no caramel malts are used. A low amount of peaty character may be present, and may be perceived as earthy or smoky. The smoky character comes from the water or yeast, not from the malt. Very small amounts of peat smoked malt may be used to replicate the smoke character, but the use of large amounts is inappropriate for this style and turn it into a smoke beer, rather than a Scottish ale. They have a medium body which can be a bit creamy. Most of these beers finish fairly dry despite their relatively sweet palate, often due to small additions of roasted barley.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.016
IBUs: 15 - 30
SRM: 9 - 17
Alcohol: 3.9% - 5.0%

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Scotch Strong Ale / Wee Heavy
Scotch Strong Ale / Wee Heavy

This style is rich, malty and usually sweet. This is a high alcohol style which can almost be considered a dessert. The strength of the maltiness can vary, but the complexity of malt flavors create a well rounded impression. Hopping is kept to a minimum and fermentation is usually done at cooler temperatures, creating an intense, yet clean malt profile. Scotch Strong Ales are light copper to dark brown in color, often with deep ruby highlights. The flavors are richly malty with kettle caramelization often apparent, particularly in stronger versions. Hints of roasted malt, nutty or smoky flavors may be present, but are not extremely strong. Hop flavors and bitterness are kept low, so the malt can dominate the flavors. Low amounts of ester flavors suggesting plums, raisins or dried fruit are often present. Light alcohol flavors may be apparent as well, but kept low despite the high ABV. This style is medium-full to full-bodied, with some versions having a thick, chewy viscosity. A smooth, alcoholic warmth is often present and balances the malty sweetness. The palate is usually full and sweet, but the finish can range from sweet to medium-dry from light use of roasted barley.
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Original Gravity: 1.070 - 1.130
Final Gravity: 1.018 - 1.056
IBUs: 17 - 35
SRM: 14 - 25
Alcohol: 6.5% - 10.0%

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English Pale Ale

Ordinary Bitter
Ordinary Bitter

An easy-drinking English beer with low gravity, low alcohol and low carbonation. Some examples can be more malt balanced, but the malt should never overshadow the overall bitter impression. The lightest of the bitters, this style is also known as just “bitter”. Originally a draught ale served very fresh under no pressure (gravity or hand pump only) at cellar temperatures ("real ale"). Drinkability is a critical component of this session style. Versions of these beers that are imported into the US are often higher strength versions made specifically for export, and do not directly reflect the light balance of their native cousins. Light yellow to light copper with good clarity, bitters may have very little head due to low carbonation. These beers have a medium to high bitterness, with the emphasis on the bittering hop addition as opposed to the middle and late hopping of American ales. Most have moderately low to moderately high fruity esters and only a moderate to low hop flavor coming from earthy, resiny, or floral UK varieties. The bitterness is offset slightly by a low to medium maltiness and often caramel flavors. Balance is decidedly bitter, but the bitterness does not completely overpower the malt, ester and hop flavors. They have a light to medium-light body, low carbonation and a dry finish.
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Original Gravity: 1.032 - 1.040
Final Gravity: 1.007 - 1.011
IBUs: 25 - 35
SRM: 4 - 14
Alcohol: 3.2% - 3.8%

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Special / Best Bitter
Special / Best Bitter

Slightly stronger than an ordinary bitter, this is a flavorful, yet refreshing, English session beer with a more evident malt profile. Some examples can be more malt balanced, but the malt should never overshadow the overall bitter impression. Drinkability is a critical component of this session style. Versions of these beers that are imported into the US are often higher strength versions made specifically for export, and do not directly reflect the light balance of their native cousins. Medium gold to medium copper colored, with good clarity, bitters may have very little head due to low carbonation. These beers have a medium to high bitterness, with the emphasis on the bittering hop addition as opposed to the middle and late hopping of American ales. Most have moderately low to moderately high fruity esters and only a moderate to low hop flavor coming from earthy, resiny, or floral UK varieties. The bitterness is offset slightly by a low to medium maltiness and often caramel flavors. Balance is decidedly bitter, but the bitterness does not completely overpower the malt, ester and hop flavors. They have a medium-light body, low carbonation and a dry finish.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.048
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.012
IBUs: 25 - 40
SRM: 5 - 16
Alcohol: 3.8% - 4.6%

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Extra Special Bitter / Strong Bitter
Extra Special Bitter / Strong Bitter

This is an average-strength to moderately-strong English ale with a rather broad definition, leaving room for interpretation by the brewer. The balance between malt and hops is usually fairly even, with more malt and hop flavors than in a special or best bitter. Stronger versions may overlap somewhat with old ales, but drinkability is still a critical component of this style. Versions of these beers that are imported into the US are often higher strength versions made specifically for export, and do not directly reflect the same balance of their native cousins. In America, the term "ESB" is used to describe a malty, bitter, reddish, standard-strength (for the US) English-type ale. Golden to deep copper in color, with good clarity, these beers may have low head retention if the carbonation is also low. Medium-high bitterness with supporting malt flavors are present, often with a somewhat strong caramel malt sweetness. Hop flavor is moderate to moderately high, traditionally using earthy, or floral UK hops. Hop bitterness and flavor should be noticeable, but should not totally dominate malt flavors. May have low levels of nutty or biscuity malt flavors, adding complexity. Moderate amounts of esters give a fruity component and low amounts of alcohol flavor may be apparent with a medium-dry finish. Medium bodied, with low to moderate carbonation, stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth.
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Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.016
IBUs: 30 - 50
SRM: 6 - 18
Alcohol: 4.6% - 6.2%

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British Golden Ale
British Golden Ale



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Australian Sparkling Ale
Australian Sparkling Ale

mention why it is in `english` category, mention commonwealth and importation

Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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India Pale Ale (IPA)

English IPA
English IPA

Originally brewed to survive the voyage from England to India. India Pale Ales were given extra large doses of hops, since hops act as a natural preservative. The temperature extremes and rolling of the seas resulted in a more thoroughly attenuated beer, creating a higher alcohol content. English IPAs are hoppy, moderately strong ales that feature English malt, hops and yeast. They have less hop character and a more pronounced malt flavor than American IPAs, but are hoppier and less malty than English pale ales or bitters. The color of these beers range from golden amber to light copper, but most are pale with an orange tint. The hop flavor will be in medium to high amounts and should be floral, earthy, fruity, or slightly grassy from the use of English hop varieties. Medium amounts of English malt character are noticeable and support the hops, adding a bit of balance to the overall flavor profile. The malt flavors are bready, biscuity, toasty, toffee-like or caramelly. Low levels of diacetyl or fruitiness from the fermentation may be present and add to the overall complexity. English IPAs have a smooth, medium-bodied mouthfeel and finish medium to dry with a lingering bitterness.

Original Gravity: 1.050 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.018
IBUs: 40 - 60
SRM: 8 - 14
Alcohol: 5.0% - 7.5%

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American IPA
American IPA

A moderately strong American pale ale that is decidedly hoppy and bitter. This is an American evolution of the English IPA that is brewed using native American ingredients. The American grown hop varieties impart powerful flavors and aromas that usually include strong pine or citrus qualities. The color for these beers range from medium gold to medium reddish copper and dry-hopped versions are often bit hazy. Like all IPAs, this style produces a big head with good retention. Hop flavor is medium to high, and reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous or fruity aspects. American IPAs tend to have more hop bitterness than their English cousins, but the malt backbone will support the strong hop character and provide a good balance. Malt flavors are fairly low and are generally clean and malty with just a little caramel or toasty flavors. Not as full-bodied as the English IPAs, these beers have a smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel. The bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh, leaving the sensation of a crisp, medium-dry finish.

Original Gravity: 1.056 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.018
IBUs: 40 - 70
SRM: 6 - 15
Alcohol: 5.5% - 7.5%

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Double IPA
Double IPA

An American innovation made to satisfy the need of hop aficionados for increasingly intense products. "Double" simply means that this is a stronger version of IPA and the terms imperial, extra or extreme are also used to describe this style. This is an intensely hoppy, high alcohol pale ale with great drinkability, not a heavy beer with a lot of malt. The color ranges from golden amber to medium reddish copper and dry-hopped versions may be a bit hazy. All IPAs have a big head with good retention. A strong, complex hop flavor can come from almost any hop variety, but is usually derived from potent American hop types. Double IPAs have a high hop bitterness, sometimes to the point of absurdity, but the malts provide a balancing factor. Malt flavors are fairly low and are generally clean and malty with just a little caramel or toasty flavors. These beers have a smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel. The bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh, leaving the sensation of a crisp, medium-dry finish. The strength of these beers can leave an alcoholic warming sensation.

Original Gravity: 1.070 - 1.090
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.020
IBUs: 60 - 120
SRM: 8 - 15
Alcohol: 7.5% - 10.0%

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Black IPA
Black IPA

Also known as American Black Ale or Cascadian Dark, Black IPA is a variation on the American IPA style created to satisfy a demand for diversity in heavily hopped beers. The use of dark or roasted grains creates the malt complexity of a stout or porter, but with the high hopping rates of an IPA. The two flavor aspects balance each other out, creating an extremely complex combination of flavors with no single flavor overpowering the senses. As the name implies, Black IPAs range in color from a dark brown to pure black. These beers have a big head with good retention and a dark tan color. The hop flavor is most often derived from potent American hop types, but almost any hop variety may be used. Malt flavors are strong and have a complex combination of malty, bready, caramel and roast tones. The use of de-bittered black malts creates the darker colors without imparting an overpowering or ash-like harshness. These beers have a smooth, medium to full-bodied mouthfeel. Both the bitterness and some malty sweetness may linger into the aftertaste, but neither should be harsh or cloying.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.056 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.012 - 1.020
IBUs: 40 - 70
SRM: 20 - 60
Alcohol: 5.5% - 7.5%

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White IPA
White IPA

A relatively new style inspired by the increasing demand for diversity in heavily hopped beers. This style combines the easy-drinking, mildly spicy nature of a Belgian Wit with the strong hop character of an American IPA. This style is a session beer that isn`t too heavy or tiring for the taste buds, while still having a complex and robust hop profile. Generally lighter in color than other IPAs, these beers are very pale straw to light gold in color. The beer will often be cloudy, which gives it a milky appearance. Large amounts of both wheat and hops create a fluffy white head that hangs around for a long time. Hop flavor is medium to high, and often reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous or fruity aspects. Hop bitterness is not quite as assertive as traditional American IPAs, giving this style more drinkability. The flavors and bitterness of the hops may be supported by subtle spice additions, adding complexity to the flavor profile, but neither hops nor spices should be extremely powerful. Medium-light bodied, this style can finish dry or mildly tart. They have the refreshing effervescence of a witbier in the finish, and can have a mild lingering hoppiness.

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.014
IBUs: 35 - 60
SRM: 2 - 5
Alcohol: 4.5% - 6.0%

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Red IPA
Red IPA



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Brown IPA
Brown IPA



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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RyePA
RyePA

A variation on the India Pale Ale style that uses a significant amount of malted rye in its grain bill. The inclusion of rye adds a subtle spiciness and creates a mouth-coating texture that can be almost oily in some cases. This is a hoppy, medium to high alcohol pale ale with great drinkability, despite the thicker mouthfeel of the rye. The color ranges from a pale gold to medium reddish copper and dry-hopped versions may be a bit hazy. All IPAs have a big head with good retention. Hop flavor is medium to strong and is usually derived from potent American hop types. Hop bitterness is usually in line with the American IPA style, and is augmented by the slightly spicy rye character. Malt flavors are still fairly low and generally clean with just a little caramel or toasty flavors, and a subtle spiciness from the rye grain will be present. These beers have a medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel that is slick and coats the tongue and mouth. The bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh, leaving the sensation of a crisp finish.

Original Gravity: 1.056 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.018
IBUs: 40 - 70
SRM: 6 - 15
Alcohol: 5.5% - 7.5%

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Porter

English Porter / Brown Porter
English Porter / Brown Porter

Originating in England, the porter style evolved from a blend of young and aged beers that was popular at pubs. This substantial English dark ale is said to have been favored by porters and other physical laborers. The Brown Porter differs from a Robust Porter in that it usually has softer, sweeter and more caramel-like flavors with lower gravities and usually less alcohol. It has more substance and roast than a Brown Ale, but not as much as a traditional stout. Light brown to dark brown in color, this style often has ruby highlights when held up to light. Malt flavor includes a mild to moderate roasted quality that frequently comes with a chocolate character. Significant caramel, nutty or toffee character are also common and there may be supporting flavors such as coffee, licorice, biscuits or toast. Porters do not have a significant acrid or burnt character from black malts, but small amounts may contribute a bitter chocolate complexity. Medium range hop bitterness will vary the balance from slightly malty to slightly bitter. The hop flavors are of a mild to moderate English hop character.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.014
IBUs: 18 - 35
SRM: 20 - 30
Alcohol: 4.0% - 5.4%

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American Porter / Robust Porter
American Porter / Robust Porter

Robust Porter is a stronger, hoppier or roastier version of porter designed as either a historical throwback or an American interpretation of the style. This is a substantial, malty dark ale with a complex and flavorful roasty character. A rather broad style open to brewer interpretation, it may be distinguished from Stout in that it lacks a strong roasted barley character, but a black patent or roasted grain character is usually present, distinguishing it from Brown Porter. Robust Porters are medium brown to very dark brown in color (sometimes almost black), often with ruby or garnet highlights. Clarity may be difficult to discern in such a dark beer, but when not opaque it will be clear. It has a full, tan-colored head with good retention. A moderately strong malt flavor usually features a lightly burnt, black malt character and sometimes chocolate or coffee flavors. The flavor may have a sharp character from dark roasted grains, but should not be overly acrid or burnt. The medium to high hop bitterness can be accentuated by the roasted malt. The amount of hop flavor can vary, but always balances the roasted malt flavors. Traditional versions will have a more subtle hop character, often from English varieties, while modern versions may be considerably more aggressive. Medium to medium-full bodied this beer has moderate levels of carbonation. Stronger versions may have a slight alcohol warmth and there may be a slight astringency from roasted grains. The finish may be from dry to medium-sweet, and will have a bit of roasty dryness at the end.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.065
Final Gravity: 1.012 - 1.016
IBUs: 25 - 50
SRM: 22 - 35
Alcohol: 4.8% - 6.5%

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Baltic Porter
Baltic Porter

A traditional beer from countries bordering the Baltic Sea, this style is derived from English porters and influenced by Russian Imperial Stouts. A Baltic Porter has the malt flavors reminiscent of an English brown porter and the restrained roast of a schwarzbier, but with a higher OG and alcohol content than either. It is very complex, with multiple layers flavor. The color is dark reddish copper to opaque dark brown (not black), with a thick and persistent tan-colored head. The flavor and aroma have a rich malty sweetness with a complex blend of deep malt, dried fruit esters, and alcohol. There is a prominent yet smooth roasted flavor that stops short of tasting burnt. The malt profile can have a caramel, toffee, nutty, molasses and/or licorice complexity and light hints of black currant and dark fruit esters may be apparent. Medium-low bitterness comes from both malt and hops, and is just enough to provide balance. Hop flavor from slightly spicy hops ranges from none to medium-low. Full-bodied, mouth-filling and very smooth, Baltic Porters have a clean lager character and a well-aged alcohol warmth. They Start sweet but darker malt flavors quickly dominates and persists through finish. Just a touch dry with a hint of roast coffee or licorice in the finish. Medium-high carbonation, makes them seem even more mouth-filling, but not heavy on the tongue. Baltic Porters are generally brewed with lager yeast, but lower temperature ale fermentations can be done as well.

Original Gravity: 1.060 - 1.090
Final Gravity: 1.016 - 1.024
IBUs: 20 - 40
SRM: 17 - 30
Alcohol: 5.5% - 9.5%

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Pre-Prohibition Porter
Pre-Prohibition Porter



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Stout

Irish Stout / Dry Stout
Irish Stout / Dry Stout

This is a very dark, roasty, bitter ale with a somewhat creamy mouthfeel. The style evolved from attempts to capitalize on the success of London porters, but originally reflected a fuller, creamier, more “stout” body and strength. The style was originally called a “Stout Porter”, and when a brewery offered both a stout and a porter, the stout was always the stronger beer. Modern versions are brewed from a lower OG and no longer reflect a higher strength than porters. While many commercial versions rely primarily on roasted barley as the dark grain, others use chocolate malt, black malt or combinations of the three. The level of bitterness is somewhat variable, as is the roasted character and the dryness of the finish. Deep brown with garnet highlights to jet black in color, stouts can be opaque but should be clear if light passes through them. A thick, creamy, long-lasting, tan to brown head is characteristic. A well roasted, grainy sharpness is present and there may be a bittersweet or unsweetened chocolate character, cocoa or coffee-like tones. There is usually little to no hop flavor, but hop bitterness can be fairly high to compliment the dark grains and a mild acidic sourness may also be present. Medium-light to medium-full bodied, stouts have a creamy character and low to moderate carbonation. This beer is smooth, despite the high hop bitterness and significant amount of dark grains. The high dosage of roasted barley creates a characteristic dry finish.
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Original Gravity: 1.036 - 1.050
Final Gravity: 1.007 - 1.011
IBUs: 30 - 45
SRM: 25 - 40
Alcohol: 4.0% - 5.0%

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Sweet / Milk Stout
Sweet / Milk Stout

An English style of stout that is very dark and slightly roasty, but full-bodied and sweet. This style often tastes like a chocolate milkshake or sweetened espresso. The “milk” name is derived from the use of lactose (milk sugar) as a sweetener. Variations on the style exist, with the balance between residual sweetness and roast character being the main point of interpretation. Very dark brown to black in color, sweet stouts can be opaque, but should be clear if light is able to pass through them. Dark roasted grains and malts dominate the flavor and provide coffee and chocolate flavors. Less roasted versions often have a cream-like sweetness. Hop bitterness is lower than in dry stout to allow the sweetness to shine through. The medium to high sweetness provides a counterpoint to the roasted character and hop bitterness, and lasts into the finish. The body is medium-full to full and creamy and the high residual sweetness from unfermented sugars enhances the full-tasting, milky mouthfeel.
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Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.012 - 1.024
IBUs: 20 - 40
SRM: 30 - 40
Alcohol: 4.0% - 6.0%

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Oatmeal Stout
Oatmeal Stout

A variant of the Sweet Stout style that is usually less sweet than the original and relies on oatmeal for body and complexity rather than lactose for body and sweetness. This is a very dark, full-bodied, roasty and malty ale with a complementary oatmeal flavor. Generally between sweet and dry stouts in sweetness, variations exist that range from fairly sweet to quite dry. The level of bitterness also varies, as does the oatmeal impression. Light use of oatmeal may give a certain silkiness of body and richness of flavor, while heavy use of oatmeal can be fairly intense in flavor with an almost oily mouthfeel. Oatmeal Stouts are medium brown to black in color, with a tan to brown head that is thick, creamy and persistent. The beer can be opaque, but should be clear if light can pass through it. The flavor is malty with the complexity of oats and dark roasted grains. Dark grains can combine with malt sweetness to give the effect of milk chocolate or coffee and cream and the addition of oats can create an oatmeal-like impression. They have a medium hop bitterness with the balance leaning toward malt and low hop flavor. Oatmeal Stouts are medium-full to full bodied, creamy, smooth and silky.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.065
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.018
IBUs: 25 - 40
SRM: 22 - 40
Alcohol: 4.2% - 5.9%

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Foreign Extra Stout
Foreign Extra Stout

Alternately known as “Tropical Stouts”, these were originally high-gravity stouts brewed for tropical markets. The style is often thought of as either a scaled-up dry or sweet stout, or a scaled-down Imperial stout. Some bottled export versions of dry or sweet stout also fit this profile, as they are stronger versions of their lower gravity counterparts. A rather broad class of stouts, these can be either fruity and sweet, dry and bitter, or even tinged with a slight sourness. They are very dark, moderately strong, roasty ales. Very deep brown to black in color, the clarity of these beers is usually obscured by the dark color. A large tan to brown head with good retention should be present. Tropical versions can be quite sweet without much roast or bitterness, while export versions can be moderately dry. Roasted grain and malt character will be apparent, but the sharpness of a Dry Stout will not be present. Tropical versions can have high fruity esters, restrained bitterness and a rum-like quality. Export versions tend to have less esters, more assertive roast flavors and higher bitterness. Little to no hop flavor will be present. Medium to full bodied, they often come with a smooth, creamy character and may give a warming (but never hot) sensation from higher alcohol presence.

Original Gravity: 1.056 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.018
IBUs: 30 - 70
SRM: 30 - 40
Alcohol: 5.5% - 8.0%

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Irish Extra Stout
Irish Extra Stout



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Tropical Stout
Tropical Stout



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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American Stout
American Stout

A hoppy, bitter, strongly roasted Foreign-style Stout of the export variety. This style generally has bolder roasted malt flavors and hopping than other traditional stouts (except Imperials). Different version express individuality through varying the roasted malt profile, malt sweetness and flavor, and the amount of finishing hops used. Usually jet black in color, although some may appear very dark brown, they have a large, persistent head of light tan to light brown color and are typically opaque. Moderate to very high roasted malt flavors are present, often tasting of roasted coffee beans or dark chocolate. There may be a slight burnt coffee ground flavor. Low to medium malt sweetness, often with rich chocolate or caramel flavors, is present. American Stouts have a medium to high bitterness, with the balance more towards bitterness and hops than other Stouts. Hop flavor can vary from low to high, and generally reflects citrusy or resiny American varieties. These beers are medium to full in body and can be somewhat creamy. Light to moderately strong alcohol warmth may appear, but the style is smooth and not excessively hot. The finish ends with the dry roast quality typical of a stout.
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Original Gravity: 1.050 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.022
IBUs: 35 - 75
SRM: 30 - 40
Alcohol: 5.0% - 7.0%

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Imperial Stout
Imperial Stout

An intensely flavored, big, dark ale that is roasty, fruity, and bittersweet, with a noticeable alcohol presence. Originally brewed to high gravity and hopping level in England for export to the Baltic States and Russia. This style is said to have been popular with the Russian Imperial Court. Today, it is even more popular with American craft brewers, who have extended the style with unique American characteristics. Variations exist, with English style and American style interpretations. The wide range of allowable characteristics allow for maximum brewer creativity. Color may range from very dark reddish-brown to jet black. These beers are opaque with a deep tan to dark brown head that is well-formed but may have low retention. Rich, deep, complex and quite intense, the flavor has varying amounts of roasted grain, maltiness, fruity esters, and hop character from any variety. Roasted grain flavors can suggest bittersweet or unsweetened chocolate, cocoa, strong coffee, burnt grain or tar. A medium to aggressively high level of bitterness keeps the beer from being cloying, although the balance can lean toward malty sweetness or even take on a barley-wine like richness. High attenuation prevents these beers from becoming syrupy or overly sweet. Fruity esters may present, and take on a dark fruit character. Alcohol strength is typically detectable, but isn`t hot or solvent-like. The finish can vary from relatively dry to moderately sweet and usually has some lingering roastiness, hop bitterness and warming character. Full-bodied and chewy with a luscious and velvety texture, these beers have a gentle warmth from the alcohol. Imperial Stouts are great candidates for long term aging, which affects the balance and intensity of flavors.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.075 - 1.115
Final Gravity: 1.018 - 1.030
IBUs: 50 - 90
SRM: 30 - 40
Alcohol: 8.0% - 12.0%

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Strong Ale

Old Ale
Old Ale

A traditional English ale style with significant alcoholic strength and a sweet, malty balance. Old Ales aren`t quite as powerful as Barleywines, but are stronger than other English styles. They are often aged after fermentation to create a Brett, oxidation or leather character. Amber to very dark reddish-brown in color, these beers have a moderately low head that may be reduced by the alcohol content or age. A high amount of complex malt character often comes with nutty, caramel or molasses-like flavors and the common addition of black treacle gives this style a unique quality. Light chocolate or roasted malt flavors may be present, but never prominent. Old ales may be well hopped, but they are generally balanced toward the malt and have a bit of sweetness. Well aged examples will often have a more muted hop bitterness. Fruity esters are common, often with a vinous character, and extended aging may contribute oxidation flavors similar to Sherry, Port or Madeira. The alcoholic strength is discernible, but not overwhelming. The body for this style ranges from medium to full dependent on aging conditions. Older versions have less body and a drier finish while younger ones will be thicker and almost chewy with a sweeter finish. The amount of carbonation also varies, starting low and gradually increasing as the beer conditions. Many winter warmers are variations of this style that are maltier, fuller-bodied and darker.

Original Gravity: 1.060 - 1.090
Final Gravity: 1.015 - 1.022
IBUs: 30 - 60
SRM: 10 - 22
Alcohol: 6.0% - 9.0%

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American Strong Ale
American Strong Ale



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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British Strong Ale
British Strong Ale



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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English Barleywine
English Barleywine

The strongest of the English Ales. Barleywine is a style dedicated to malty richness and intense flavors. These beers are often aged after fermentation and can change flavors significantly as they grow older. English Barleywines have less hop character than American versions, and feature English hop varieties. English versions are often darker, maltier, fruitier, and richer than American Barleywines. The color ranges from a rich gold to very dark amber or brown with ruby highlights and an off-white head. Intense malty flavors are the highlight of this style and exhibit bready, biscuity, nutty, toast, dark caramel, toffee and molasses qualities. Barleywines have a moderately high sweetness, although the finish may be sweet or dry depending on the beer`s age. A dried-fruit character should be fairly prevalent. Hop bitterness ranges, allowing the balance to range from malty to somewhat bitter. Moderate hop flavor from UK varieties is present, but not as strong as in American versions. Some oxidation or vinous flavors may be present in well aged versions and complex alcohol flavors should be evident, but not harsh. These beers are full-bodied and chewy, with a luscious texture. The carbonation is moderate, and will vary depending on age and conditioning.

Original Gravity: 1.080 - 1.120
Final Gravity: 1.018 - 1.030
IBUs: 35 - 70
SRM: 8 - 22
Alcohol: 8.0% - 12.0%

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American Barleywine
American Barleywine

An interpretation of the English Barleywine that is more hop forward. The use of American hop varieties is evident in this style, but does not tip the balance too far away from the malt or leave an extreme, IPA-like hop impression. These beers are often aged after fermentation and can change flavors significantly as they grow older. Color ranges from light amber to copper and often includes ruby highlights and an off-white head. A noticeable bitterness balances out the intense malt flavors, which will have less bready and caramel qualities than in English versions. Hop bitterness can be moderately strong and aggressive, balancing toward the bitterness even though a malty sweetness is still present. This style has a moderately high amount if hop flavor, moderate fruity esters and a noticeable alcohol presence. The flavors will decline over time, but any oxidized character is generally hidden by the higher hop content. These beers are full-bodied and chewy, but not syrupy or under-attenuated. The carbonation is moderate, and will vary depending on age and conditioning. The alcohol strength and hop bitterness combine to leave a very long finish that varies from somewhat sweet to dry.

Original Gravity: 1.080 - 1.120
Final Gravity: 1.016 - 1.030
IBUs: 50 - 120
SRM: 10 - 19
Alcohol: 8.0% - 12.0%

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Wheatwine
Wheatwine



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Belgian Ale

Witbier
Witbier

Witbier, or Belgian Wit is a 400-year-old style of beer that nearly died out in the 1950s. It was revived by Pierre Celis and has grown steadily in popularity over time. Witbier is a refreshing wheat-based ale of light to moderate strength that is commonly spiced with orange peel and coriander. Very pale straw to light gold in color, the beer will be cloudy, which gives it a milky appearance. A dense white head sits on top of the beer and has good retention. Pleasantly sweet, witbiers often have a honey or vanilla character and a zesty citrus fruitiness. They are refreshingly crisp, with a low amount of wheat flavor and subtle herbal qualities. Freshly ground coriander and orange peel are the most common spices used and complement the sweet aroma and crisp taste. Chamomile, cumin, cinnamon, grains of paradise and other spices may add complexity but are much less prominent. A low level of spicy-earthy hop flavor may be present, but never gets in the way of the spices. Hop bitterness is low and does not persist into the finish. A light sourness of lactic acid is sometimes, but not always, present. Medium-light bodied, this style often has a smoothness and light creaminess from the addition of unmalted wheat or oats, but finishes dry and possibly tart. Witbiers are highly carbonated, creating a refreshing effervescance and light acidity in the finish. This style rarely ages well, so fresher examples will be most desirable.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.044 - 1.052
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.012
IBUs: 10 - 20
SRM: 2 - 4
Alcohol: 4.5% - 5.5%

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Belgian Pale Ale
Belgian Pale Ale

This is a copper colored ale from Belgium that is fruity, moderately malty and somewhat spicy, but still easy drinking. Considered “everyday” beers in the Flemish provinces of Antwerp and Brabant, they are Belgian “session beers”. They are well balanced with no one flavor taking dominance over another. Amber to copper in color, Belgian pales have good clarity and a creamy, rocky, white head that often falls more quickly than in other Belgian beers. The flavors are fruity and a bit spicy with a soft malt character and relatively light hopping. An orange or pear like fruitiness may appear, but this style is not as fruity or citrusy as other Belgian ales. The malty sweetness starts the flavor with a toasty, biscuity or nutty malt flavor. There is little hop flavor and the hop bitterness is medium at most. Low amounts of peppery phenols may compliment the spicy and floral hop flavors. Medium to medium-light in body, the alcohol level in these beers is restrained. The finish ranges from moderately dry to moderately sweet, and the drier examples showcase the hops more than sweeter versions.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.014
IBUs: 20 - 30
SRM: 8 - 14
Alcohol: 4.8% - 5.5%

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Belgian IPA
Belgian IPA

A relatively new style inspired by its American counterpart, this style combines the assertive pine and citrus hop character of the American IPA with the potent fruity notes found in many Belgian beers. The color for these beers range from gold to reddish copper or amber color and dry-hopped versions are often bit hazy. Like all IPAs, this style produces a billowing head with good retention. Hop flavor is medium to high, and reflects an American hop character with citrusy, floral, resinous or fruity aspects. Hop bitterness is generally cleaner than in American versions. The flavors and bitterness of the hops is augmented by the fruity ester from Belgian yeast strains and may be balanced with additional toasty and biscuity specialty malts. These beers have a smooth, medium-light to medium-bodied mouthfeel. Both the bitterness and fruitiness may linger into the aftertaste, and the beer leaves the sensation of a dry finish.

Original Gravity: 1.060 - 1.085
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.015
IBUs: 35 - 65
SRM: 6 - 12
Alcohol: 6.0% - 10.0%

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Belgian Blond Ale
Belgian Blond Ale

Designed to appeal to European Pils drinkers, this is a moderate-strength golden ale with a subtle Belgian complexity. Blonds are gold colored and clear with a creamy white head and good lacing. The flavor starts off with a light pilsner malt sweetness with a moderate hop and alcohol bitterness that balances it out. Mild spicy or earthy hop flavors are present and there may be some caramelized sugar or honey-like sweetness as well. A yeast character of esters and spicy phenolics will also be noticeable, but not as strong as in other Belgian styles. This style is cleaner than other Belgian beers and can be almost lager-like or akin to an American Blonde. Moderate high carbonation can create a fizzy sensation in the mouth while the medium body can give a creamy sensation. Blonds finish dry and can have a bit of alcohol warmth in the aftertaste.

Original Gravity: 1.062 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.018
IBUs: 15 - 30
SRM: 4 - 7
Alcohol: 6.0% - 7.5%

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Belgian Golden
Belgian Golden

A complex, effervescent and high alcohol Belgian-style ale. Belgian Goldens are similar to Tripels, but can be paler, lighter-bodied, crisper and drier. They are complex and delicate with an assertive hoppiness and spiciness. Golden in color with good clarity, they have a long-lasting, rocky white head that leaves a lacing on the glass. Spicy, fruity and mild alcohol flavors are supported by a soft malt profile. Belgian yeast strains provide esters reminiscent of pears, oranges or apples and some peppery phenolic character. A spicy hop character is often present as well, and the hops and phenols work together to create a distinct bittering impression. A moderate alcohol flavor is often notable and creates a smooth warming sensation. Goldens are very highly carbonated with a lighter body than the high gravity implies. The high carbonation brings out the variety of flavors and helps to create a drier finish and lighter body that makes the hops and spiciness more prominent than in a Tripel. This style is traditionally bottle-conditioned rather than force carbonated.

Original Gravity: 1.070 - 1.095
Final Gravity: 1.005 - 1.016
IBUs: 22 - 35
SRM: 3 - 6
Alcohol: 7.5% - 10.5%

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Trappist or Abbey Ale

Trappist-style Single
Trappist-style Single



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Belgian Dubbel
Belgian Dubbel

A complex Belgian ale with a stronger malt presence and darker color than most Belgian styles. Dubbels have a dark amber, copper or deep red color, and are usually clear. A malty flavor profile that is rich and complex is complimented by ester, alcohol and phenol tones. Raisin and other dried fruit flavors are common. Hop flavor is usually absent and there is just enough bittering to prevent excessive sweetness. Malt is center stage for this style, but not as pronounced as a bock or Scottish ale. Dubbels are medium to full in body, with a relatively high carbonation. They finish moderately dry despite the malt focus and a smooth alcohol warmth may be present. This style is traditionally bottle-conditioned rather than force carbonated.

Original Gravity: 1.062 - 1.075
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.018
IBUs: 15 - 25
SRM: 10 - 17
Alcohol: 6.0% - 7.6%

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Belgian Tripel
Belgian Tripel

A lightly colored, high alcohol beer that was originally made by Belgian monasteries. Tripels are similar to Belgian Golden Ales, but are slightly darker and fuller-bodied, with a rounded malt flavor. Deep yellow/gold in color, these beers have good clarity and a rocky white head that leaves a lacing on the glass. Spicy, fruity and mild alcohol flavors are supported by a soft malt profile. Peppery phenolic character and esters reminiscent of citrus fruits are derived from the Belgian yeast strain. Medium to high bitterness and a moderate spicy hop character is common. A soft alcohol flavor is commonly notable, but not powerful. Tripels are medium-light bodied and well carbonated to give them an effervescent quality. The high alcohol content gives this style a smooth fluidity, with little to no warming sensation. The high carbonation and bitterness create a dry impression in the finish and a mildly bitter aftertaste. This style is traditionally bottle-conditioned rather than force carbonated.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.075 - 1.085
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.014
IBUs: 20 - 40
SRM: 4.5 - 7
Alcohol: 7.5% - 9.5%

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Belgian Dark
Belgian Dark

A darker colored Belgian ale that is rich, complex and very strong. Deep colors of amber or coppery-brown fill the glass and a huge light tan-colored head sits on top. Complexly flavored with a rich malty sweetness, these beers have significant esters and alcohol. The malt is rich and strong with a quality of Munich grains and a caramel, toast or bready character and a moderate sweetness. The fruity esters are usually akin to dark fruits such as raisins, plums, cherries or figs. A light peppery spiciness may be contributed by phenols, but perceivable hop character is usually absent. A soft and warming alcohol sensation is often noticeable and helps to balance the malt sweetness. These beers are highly carbonated but do not have a carbonic acid bite to them. The body and lasting sweetness can range from medium-light to full and creamy depending on the interpretation, with authentic Trappist versions leaning toward the lighter, drier side.

Original Gravity: 1.075 - 1.110
Final Gravity: 1.010 - 1.024
IBUs: 20 - 35
SRM: 12 - 22
Alcohol: 8.0% - 11.0%

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Farmhouse Ale

Saison
Saison

A seasonal style originally brewed in the French speaking part of Belgium, this is a dry and refreshing ale with a thirst quenching acidity. Produced at the end of the cool season and designed to last through the warmer months, Saisons were beers drunk by the farmhands working outside on hot summer days. These beers are often a distinctive pale orange color, but are sometimes golden or amber. Haziness is common in this style, as it is typically an unfiltered farmhouse variety. A dense, rocky white head persists on the top of the glass. A complex, well balanced combination of citrus fruits, peppery phenols and various herbal traits are the primary flavors, and can come from either the yeast or spice additions. Spicy or earthy hop varieties are usually used, and support the other flavors rather than overpowering them. A mild malty character backs up these flavors, but Saisons are not sweet. Light to medium bodied, Saisons are highly carbonated and have an effervescent quality. Very high attenuation creates the dry sensation that is characteristic of the style, and there might be a low amount of alcohol flavor or tart sourness. The dryness is complimented by a high level of acidity, which enhances the refreshing qualities of the style.
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Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.065
Final Gravity: 1.002 - 1.012
IBUs: 20 - 35
SRM: 5 - 14
Alcohol: 5.0% - 7.0%

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Bière de Garde
Bière de Garde

Bière de Garde is a malt-accentuated, farmhouse beer from Northern France. The name literally means a beer which has been kept or lagered and refers to the practice of brewing these beers in early spring and keeping them in cold cellars for consumption during the warmer summer weather. Bière de Garde is similar to the Belgian Saison style, but is rounder, richer and sweeter, with more of a malt-focus and less spiciness and tartness. There are three versions of this style (blond, amber and brown), so the color has a wide range of golden blonde to a chestnut brown. Haziness is common in this style, as it is an often unfiltered farmhouse variety, and there is a well formed, white to tan colored head. The malt flavor often has a toasty, toffee-like or caramel sweetness and the intensity and complexity of the malt tends to increase in darker versions. Medium to low hop bitterness provides some support, but the balance is always to the malt. Paler versions can have higher levels of hop flavor, but it will be balanced by the malt. Medium bodied with a smooth character, this style has moderately high carbonation. The malt flavor lasts into the finish, is not cloying leaving a medium-dry impression.

Original Gravity: 1.060 - 1.080
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.016
IBUs: 18 - 28
SRM: 6 - 19
Alcohol: 6.0% - 8.5%

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American Brett Beer
American Brett Beer

farmhouse?

Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Sahti
Sahti

A farmhouse ale originating in Finland, Sahti has a unique inclusion of juniper flavors. After the grains were mashed, they were traditionally scooped into a wooden trough filled with juniper twigs. The juniper acted as a filter bed to separate the sweet wort from the grist during mashing and sparging. This process would infuse the hot wort with the resiny flavors of the juniper wood which balanced the sweetness of the malts in lieu of hop additions. The wort wasn`t boiled, leaving behind a lot of proteins and contributing to a heavy body. Finnish bakers yeast was used to ferment, imparting banana qualities and creating a cloudy beer that has been compared to German Hefeweizens or Belgian Lambics. A farmhouse style, Sahti beers are exposed to wild yeast and bacteria which contribute the common farmhouse flavor characteristics and may impart a tartness in the flavor.

Original Gravity: 1.076 - 1.120
Final Gravity: 1.016 - 1.020
IBUs: 7 - 15
SRM: 4 - 22
Alcohol: 7.0% - 11.0%

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Sour Ale

Berliner Weisse
Berliner Weisse

A regional specialty of Berlin, this is a very light, low-alcohol wheat ale that is sour, dry and refreshing. Berliner Weisse is light bodied and highly carbonated, giving it a lively character and making it one of the most refreshing beers in the world. This beer is often served "mit schuss" (with a shot of sugar syrups) or mixed with a pilsner beer to balance the intense sourness. The syrups are usually flavored with raspberry, lemon or woodruff. Very pale in color, this beer can be clear or somewhat hazy. The white head has poor retention but will start off big. A sharp but clean tasting sourness of lactic acid dominates the flavor and can be very strong. Bready or grainy wheat flavor is often noticeable, but takes a backseat to the sour. Mild fruitiness or brettanomyces character may be present, but subdued. Hop bitterness and flavor are very low. Light bodied with a very dry finish, Berliner Weisse beers have very high carbonation, creating an effervescence that is characteristic of the style.

Original Gravity: 1.028 - 1.035
Final Gravity: 1.003 - 1.006
IBUs: 3 - 8
SRM: 2 - 3
Alcohol: 2.8% - 3.8%

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Lichtenhainer
Lichtenhainer



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Flanders Red Ale
Flanders Red Ale

Known as "the Burgundy of Belgium", Flanders Red is a complex and sour Belgian ale that is more wine-like than any other beer. The beer is aged for up to two years, often in oak barrels that contain the bacteria necessary to sour the beer. Deep red or burgundy to reddish-brown in color, these beers have good clarity and a white head. An intense fruity flavor of plum, orange, black cherry or red currant is present and is often supported by malt flavors, mild vanilla or chocolate. The sour and acidic trait may be mild, complimenting the fruit, or intense with an acetic quality. As the sour character increases, the sweet malty character becomes more of a background flavor. This style has no hop flavor and a restrained hop bitterness. An acidic bitterness similar to tannins can exist in moderate amounts, adding to the red wine-like character. Medium bodied with low to medium carbonation, this style has a mild astringency like a well-aged red wine. It is light and crisp on the palate. The blending of young and aged beer is sometimes done, which adds complexity and smooths out the flavors, balancing any harshness in the sour character.

Original Gravity: 1.048 - 1.057
Final Gravity: 1.002 - 1.012
IBUs: 10 - 25
SRM: 10 - 16
Alcohol: 4.6% - 6.5%

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Flanders Brown / Oud Bruin
Flanders Brown / Oud Bruin

A traditional old ale from East Flanders, this is a malty, well aged Belgian brown ale that is somewhat fruity and sour. These beers differ from Flanders Red Ales in that they have a deeper malt character and aren`t typically aged in oak, giving them less of a wine quality. Flanders Brown is less acetic and maltier than a Red, and the fruity flavors are more complimentary to the malt. Dark reddish-brown to brown in color, they have good clarity and a light tan head. The flavor profile is malty with a little caramel and complex dark fruit tones akin to raisins, plums, figs, dates, black cherries or prunes. The malt character often includes caramel, toffee, treacle or chocolate and low levels of spicy phenols can be present. The slight sourness often becomes more pronounced in well-aged examples, but should not be overly vinegar-like. Hop flavor absent and hop bitterness is restrained. Mild oxidation can occur in aged examples, adding a bit of complexity that resembles sherry. Medium to medium-full bodied, Oud Bruins have moderately low carbonation, no astringency and a sweet and tart finish. The blending of young and aged beer is sometimes done, which adds complexity and smooths out the flavors, balancing any harshness in the sour character.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.074
Final Gravity: 1.008 - 1.012
IBUs: 20 - 25
SRM: 15 - 22
Alcohol: 4.0% - 8.0%

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Lambic
Lambic

Lambics are spontaneously fermented, wheat-based sour ales from the Brussels area. They are complexly sour, and fermented using a wide variety of microorganisms native to Belgium. The spontaneous fermentation of this style causes the lambic to take on a “house character” from the brewery that creates a unique flavor that can only be created in that area. Pale yellow to deep golden in color, these beers tend to darken with age. Younger versions are often cloudy, while older ones are generally clear. The flavors change as a lambic ages, with young examples having a more noticeably sour or lactic trait and older versions being more balanced with the malt. Wheaty flavor and "barnyard" characteristics described as horsey, goaty or hay-like become notable in older lambics, as the wild yeasts have more time to develop these unique flavors. Simple fruit flavors become more complex in the older examples and are similar to light fruits, apples, or honey. They have little in the way of hop bitterness and no hop flavor. Medium-light in body, lambic dries as it ages. There is a moderate tart quality that isn`t sharp or astringent. Lambics are often served uncarbonated.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.054
Final Gravity: 1.001 - 1.010
IBUs: 0 - 10
SRM: 3 - 7
Alcohol: 5.0% - 6.5%

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Gueuze
Gueuze

Gueuze is a complex blend of lambic beers with a pleasantly sour/acidic flavor. These are well balanced, wheat-based ales that are a carefully crafted combination of spontaneously fermented lambics. Gueuze is traditionally produced by mixing one, two, and three-year old lambics. The younger lambics still contain fermentable sugars and the older lambics have the characteristic taste of wild yeast strains that takes a long time to develop. A good gueuze possesses a full and tantalizing bouquet, a sharp aroma, and a soft flavor. It is usually served carbonated, unlike straight lambics. Golden in color, they have excellent clarity and a rocky white head that lasts a long time. Balance is key to this style, with a moderately sour character augmented by the malt and yeast. Wheaty flavor and "barnyard" characteristics described as horsey, goaty or hay-like are noticeable, but not as pungent as in old lambics. A mild sweetness may complement the sourness. A variety of light fruit flavors is common, and there can be a honey-like, vanilla or oak flavor. There is usually a tart, puckering quality that isn`t sharp or astringent. Hop bitterness is very low and no hop flavor should be apparent. Light to medium-light bodied, Gueuze is highly carbonated and always effervescent.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.006
IBUs: 0 - 10
SRM: 3 - 7
Alcohol: 5.0% - 8.0%

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Fruit Lambic
Fruit Lambic

A Lambic or Gueuze that has had fruit added to it. Tart or acidic fruit is traditionally used to add another level of complexity to the beer without sweetening it. The fruit is added during the aging process, allowing the yeast and bacteria to ferment any additional sugars. The most traditional styles of fruit lambics are kriek (cherries), framboise (raspberries) and druivenlambik (muscat grapes). Fruit lambics usually take on the color of the fruit that was used. A thick, long-lasting head will sit on top of the beer and can range in color from stark white to the same color as the fruit. In younger examples, the fruit is the primary flavoring aspect, with an acidic or sometimes sour tang balancing any residual sweetness. Older examples will lose the fruit flavors and become dominated by the traditional lambic qualities. The barnyard characteristics of wild yeast are notable, distinguishing this style from other fruit beers. There may be a mild sweetness, mild vanilla or oak flavor. Hop flavor and bitterness are missing from the flavor. There is usually a tart, puckering quality that isn`t sharp or astringent. Hop bitterness is very low and no hop flavor should be apparent. Light to medium-light bodied, Gueuze is highly carbonated and always effervescent.

Original Gravity: 1.040 - 1.060
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.010
IBUs: 0 - 10
SRM: 3 - 7
Alcohol: 5.0% - 7.0%

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Mixed-Fermentation Sour
Mixed-Fermentation Sour



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Smoked or Wood-aged Beer

Rauchbier
Rauchbier

A traditional smoked beer style from Germany, Rauchbier is similar to the Oktoberfest style, but with a prominent smoke character. Generally somewhat darker than an Oktoberfest, these are amber to dark brown and very clear with large, creamy heads. The flavor is composed of a blend of smoke and malts that vary in balance, but always support each other. A malty and toasty richness should be discernible and the smoke flavor will be readily apparent, but the intensity of each will vary from subtle to quite strong. Beech wood is traditionally used for smoking the malt, which gives a softer, smoother smokiness than most other smoked malts and can impart a woody or bacon-like quality. Hop bitterness is moderate and balances well with the somewhat sweet malty character. Medium bodied with medium-high carbonation, Rauchbiers have a smooth lager character and a moderately dry finish that is enhanced by the smoke.

Original Gravity: 1.050 - 1.057
Final Gravity: 1.012 - 1.016
IBUs: 20 - 30
SRM: 12 - 22
Alcohol: 4.8% - 6.0%

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Piwo Grodziskie
Piwo Grodziskie

Also known as Grätzer, Grodzisz or `Polish Champagne`, this is a beer style that originated in Poland and features a significant amount of oak smoked wheat. Pale yellow to golden in color, this style is bright and clear despite the large amount of wheat and pour with a large, compact head. Grodziskie is light and crisp flavored with a carbonic bite and medium to high smoke impact. Oak smoked wheat is not as aggressive as some other smoked malts, and leaves a smoother smoke character that doesn`t dominate the light crisp flavor. Low to moderate levels of hop bitterness add to the crispness and traditional Polish hops give it a noble-type character. The flavor may also contain a mild wheat graininess in the background. Highly carbonated, this beer has a light body and effervescence, with a crisp aftertaste.

Original Gravity: 1.028 - 1.032
Final Gravity: 1.006 - 1.012
IBUs: 20 - 35
SRM: 3 - 6
Alcohol: 2.5% - 3.5%

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Other Smoked Beer
Other Smoked Beer

This style represents any beer (other than the ones listed here) that uses smoke as a primary aroma and flavoring agent. Any beer can be made into a smoked version. The best examples strive for a good balance between the smoke, malt and hop attributes. The appearance of these beers varies, since the underlying brew can be just about anything, but smoked versions are often a little darker than the base style. The intensity of the smokiness can vary from light to very powerful. The flavor contribution of smoked malt can be woody, earthy, char-grilled or bacon-like depending on the type of malts used. The character of a smoke malt is determined by what the malt was smoked with, hard woods such as beech, oak or cherry being common. The balance between these flavors and the base beer varies, but no one aspect should dominate and overpower the others. Body and finish are dependent on the base style used, but smoke can add some additional dryness to the finish.

Original Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
Final Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Wood Aged Beer
Wood Aged Beer



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Fruit and Spice Beer

Fruit Beer
Fruit Beer

This is a style that pairs the flavors and aromas of fresh fruit with the malt and hops of your favorite beer. This description covers a huge range of beers as long as there is fruit added into it as a significant flavor component. The balance between the fruit and beer flavors is the key to a good fruit beer. A great example will be unique from the base beer style, but not overpowering with fruitiness, allowing the attributes of the original style to come through as well. The appearance of these beers varies depending on the base beer, but lighter-colored beers can take on colors from the fruit being used in both the beer and the head. The distinct flavors of the particular fruits used ranges from subtle to aggressive, but always well balanced with the underlying beer. The fruit flavors should seem natural and support the beer, not overpowering or artificial. Some tartness may be present if natural in the particular fruit, but should not be too intense. Fruit generally adds flavor, not sweetness to fruit beers because the sugars from the fruit is usually fully fermented by the yeast. These sugars contribute to lighter body and a drier finish than is normally found in the base style.

Original Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
Final Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Spice, Herb or Vegetable Beer
Spice, Herb or Vegetable Beer

This style pairs the flavors and aromas of fresh herbs, spices or vegetables with the malt and hops of a great beer. This description covers a huge range of beers as long as a significant part of the flavor comes from these additions. This category covers the popular Chile Beer and Pumpkin Beer styles and is sometimes used to describe coffee or nut based beers. The appearance of these beers varies, since the underlying brew can be just about anything. The intensity of the herbs, spices or vegetables can range from subtle to quite powerful, but should always be well integrated with the other flavors. They should add an extra complexity to the beer, but not be so prominent as to overpower the other flavors. Balance between the beer base and the additives is important, with each ingredient complimenting the others. Often these beers use a combination of several herbs or spices, which may make the individual character of each one hard to identify. Some vegetable additions may add additional body or slickness to the mouthfeel, and additions that contain fermentable sugars may thin out the beer.

Original Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
Final Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Pumpkin / Autumn Spice Beer
Pumpkin / Autumn Spice Beer


View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Christmas / Winter Spice Beer
Christmas / Winter Spice Beer

This is a version of spiced beer that is usually strong and dark with a richer body and warming finish. Beers of a stronger and richer content make a good accompaniment for the cold winter season, and they make great bases for a brew that showcases traditional holiday spices. The intensity of these spices can range from subtle to quite powerful, but should always be well integrated with the complex malt flavors. Unusual fermentable sources such as honey, maple, molasses are often used to bump up the alcohol content and give distinct flavor additions that pair well with the spice. Medium amber to very dark brown in color, these beers can be dark enough to be virtually opaque, and have a well-formed, off-white head. Rich, malty flavors are common, and may include caramel, toast, nutty, or chocolate qualities that support the spices and often give the impression of fresh baked cookies. Dried fruit or fruit peel such as orange peel, plums or figs are occasionally included as well. Hop bitterness and flavor are often restrained to better showcase the malt and spices, but some examples will have a noticeable hoppy character. Some of the unique fermentable additions may affect the body and mouthfeel, giving the beer a light dryness or a creamy and thick texture, but this style usually finishes full and rich with a touch of alcohol warmth.
View an example of this style.

Original Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
Final Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Other

Stein Bier
Stein Bier

Steinbier (German for stone beer) is a historical type of beer that was heated using super hot stones instead of a fire. Steinbier was mashed in wooden tubs instead of kettles and the hot stones were put directly into the mashing tubs to achieve the required production temperature. Contact between the glowing hot stones and the malt created a flavor of caramelized sugars combined with a smoky or scorched quality. After the mash was complete, the sugar-coated rocks were removed and added to the fermenter to provide additional fermentables. Recipes for using this method can vary greatly and can be either ales or lagers, as long as the caramelization and soot-like smokiness is there. Commercial Steinbiers are very rare, since this method is both labor intensive and potentially dangerous.

Brewing Tips:
CAUTION!!! https://byo.com/stories/item/857-hot-rocks-making-a-stein-beer

Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Alternative Grain Beer
Alternative Grain Beer



Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Alternative Sugar Beer
Alternative Sugar Beer

Combine with alt grain?

Original Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
Final Gravity: 1.000 - 1.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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Other / Specialty Beer
Other / Specialty Beer

Any beer that does not fit the above style definitions. This is a catch-all category for brews made using unusual, uncommon and unique ingredients or processes. Specialty beers are often variations of existing styles. These brews will have the key features of the base beer, combined with the aspects from the new ingredient or procedure. A well made example will create a beer that is unlike any other, while maintaining a harmony between all the different flavors. The appearance, aroma, head retention, flavor, mouthfeel and carbonation will all vary depending on the base style, and will be affected by the unique additions. The distinctive qualities of the specialty ingredients and processes should be well stated, but not overwhelming. Creativity is the key for making a beer like this. The sky`s the limit!

Original Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
Final Gravity: 0.000 - 0.000
IBUs: 0 - 0
SRM: 0 - 0
Alcohol: 0.0% - 0.0%

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